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What is Engine Lathes?
- Feb 12, 2018 -

                                                                            What is Engine Lathes?


                                                                                     Sizes

The size of an engine lathe is determined by the largest piece of stock that can be machined. Before machining a workpiece, the following measurements must be considered: the diameter of the work that will swing over the bed and the length between lathe centers (Figure 3-1 ).

                                                                               Categories

Slight differences in the various engine lathes make it easy to group them into three categories: lightweight bench engine lathes, precision tool room lathes, and gap lathes, which are also known as extension- type lathes. These lathe categories are shown in Figure 3-2 Different manufacturers may use different lathe categories.

                                                                             Lightweight

Lightweight bench engine lathes are generally small lathes with a swing of 10 inches or less, mounted to a bench or table top. These lathes can accomplish most machining jobs, but may be limited due to the size of the material that can be turned.

                                                                              Precision

Precision tool room lathes are also known as standard manufacturing lathes and are used for all lathe operations, such as turning, boring, drilling, reaming, producing screw threads, taper turning, knurling, and radius forming, and can be adapted for special milling operations with the appropriate fixture. This type of lathe can handle workplaces up to 25 inches in diameter and up to 200 inches long. However, the general size is about a l5-inch swing with 36 to 48 inches between centers. Many tool room lathes are used for special tool and die production due to the high accuracy of the machine.